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Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapies Adversely Affect Fertility in Men- A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

[ Vol. 19 , Issue. 7 ]

Author(s):

Antara Banerjee, Marco Scarpa*, Surajit Pathak, Patrizia Burra, Giacomo C. Sturniolo, Francesco P. Russo, Ram Murugesan and Renata D'Incá*   Pages 959 - 974 ( 16 )

Abstract:


Background and Aims: Sexual functions are sometimes adversely affected by the therapeutic drugs delivered for treating IBD. Much attention has been focused on pregnancy/sexual issues in women. Relatively less attention has been poured in to address this issue in men. This systematic review assesses the drugs having potential detrimental effects on fertility in men.

Methods: Three databases were searched by two researchers independently for potentially relevant publications between 1964 to 2015 and 249 papers were retrieved. Studies that dealt with sexual problems after IBD drugs administration were included in the purview of this review.

Results: Fourteen studies with 327 human patients and 110 animals were analysed. Sulphasalazine treated patients had lower spermatozoa count, lower sperm motility and higher risk of oligospermia compared to mesalazine treated ones. Biologics seem to be safe to use while attempting to conceive however, proper clinical studies reporting male fertility problems in IBD patients are lacking. Azathioprine caused oligospermia but a meta-analytical approach was not possible due to heterogeneity in studies. Some animal studies showed methotrexate affects abnormal testis structure and spermatogenesis.

Conclusion: This study summarises the current literature and safety issues affecting fertility parameters in men and animals treated with IBD therapeutic drugs, which can further assist clinicians in better management of adult male IBD patients.

Keywords:

Inflammatory bowel disease, therapies, male fertility, Ulcerative colitis, azathioprine, oligospermia.

Affiliation:

Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology/Multivisceral Transplant Unit, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Oncological Surgery Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS), Padova, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology/Multivisceral Transplant Unit, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology/Multivisceral Transplant Unit, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology/Multivisceral Transplant Unit, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology/Multivisceral Transplant Unit, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Chettinad Academy of Research and Education (CARE), Chettinad Hospital and Research Institute (CHRI), Chennai, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology/Multivisceral Transplant Unit, University Hospital Padova, Padova

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